Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Study: Obesity increases risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

Obesity may be linked to an increased risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma, according to a large prospective cohort study.
BMI was associated with a higher risk of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Abdominal obesity — measured by waist size and waist-to-hip ratio — was associated with increased risk of esophageal cancer.
The study cohort included 218,854 subjects from the NIH–AARP Diet and Health Study, conducted in 1995 and 1996.
Investigators found that waist circumference alone was related to an increased risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. They also found that in patients with normal BMI (18.5 <Kg/m?), a positive association persisted between waist-to-hip ratio and esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Obesity is the single most important problem facing first world as well as developing nations as decreased human activity coupled with increased calorie intake is causing an epidemic wave of children and adults.
Not only does obesity lead to diabetes, cardiovascular complications, and strokes but also many cancers such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer and gastric as well as esophageal cancer.
In my opinion, children need to exercise much more and eat a healthier diet.   Restaurants need to be required by law to disclose the calorie content of every single meal on the menu, and insurance companies should pay for personal trainers and cooks for those who need to change their lifestyle drastically for at least a period of 6 months.

Tony Talebi, MD

No comments:

Post a Comment